Making millions of dollars by as small investment as a few thousand dollars in new techs such as photo message app is a big deal. Unless the investor closely focuses on what is up among teens nowadays. That was done to win the jackpot in high-tech ventures by Saint Francis High School in Mountain View. The school turned $15,000 into a big amount of profit in 2012 through Snap Inc., the Snapchat photo maker – the most popular teenage app for that year.

SFHSMV’s Snap Inc capital that grew a publically traded organization, was worth $24 million last Thursday.

A High School Transferred $15,000 Into $24 Million via A High Tech Jackpot In Snap IPO
A High School Transferred $15,000 Into $24 Million via A High Tech Jackpot In Snap IPO

Business with small tech organizations that design consumer apps is just similar to purchasing lottery tickets. The chances of profit and loss hang unstable, somehow, weighing down the loss.

The reason behind this fact is obvious; only few tech products qualify market test to get esteemed among consumers. Only a few products actually access the mass market this way. So, investors mostly not earn in high-tech small businesses.

But it is not an impossible thing as proved by SFHSMV.

How is it possible to separate earners and losers among investors? The answer is by taking a view of “early adopters” and “pioneers“, teens who are keen to give a trial to new techs in the market and share their excitements with friends and fellows, create buzz for the tech products and fuel WOM.

Particularly, “pioneers” are inquisitive and twitchy, consumers magnetized by the fresh and the striking, as told by marketers. The consumers who are every time in the quest for the products that will boost their personal and commercial living experience are “early adopters“. It is a bigger group than the pioneer, the way to access to an even bigger set of people, the “early majority“, and push the products to hit the mass market by crossing the “tipping point”.

That is when sales grow just like that of SFHSMV.